Wednesday, 19 June 2019

2019 #9 Arty Wood Blocks: Recycling Day! with ELB by Lucy Edmondson

2019 Topic 9: Arty Wood Blocks


I am rather partial to a little row of houses, particularly wooden ones. In fact, one of the few decor items I brought with us from New Zealand when we moved to the UK 18 years ago (bearing in mind we literally moved with 6 suitcases, so space was tight) is a small row of delicately painted wooden houses. They still sit in our bathroom to this day. Lucy has added colour and texture to hers and plenty of other lovely little touches too! ~ Leandra

Hi everyone, it's Lucy from Lucy's True Colours with you here today, with a post using recycled wood blocks to make a row of arty houses, using my favourite Lin Brown Eclectica stamps.

I think most of us have found that the old style wooden block rubber stamps take up a great deal of space - imagine if our whole stash was wood mounted now, our ceilings would collapse! Having said that, I was lucky enough to be given a bag of wooden blocks when my friend unmounted her older stamps a while ago, and there is something rather lovely about these pieces of solid wood. So I was very delighted to have this theme pop up and have a chance to use them. To remove the stamps and labels simply pop them in the microwave. To remove any remaining tackiness, you can buy sticky stuff remover very cheaply on e bay and you can also sand any residue away.


If your wood still needs any prepping, you can give it a couple of coats of white gesso to ensure any colours you add stay true. 


To start off, I covered tissue paper with a huge selection of leaf and abstract stamps from Lin Brown Eclectica ELB 29, ELB 30, ELB 31, ELB 33, and ELB 34.






I covered my three house blocks with the tissue and also a large piece to act as a plinth (no, this wasn't a ginormous rubber stamp block but an off cut from my husband's new woodworking hobby which I hope will prove useful in the future!).


I used a wash of translucent Fresco Finish Acrylic Paints, Hey Pesto, Autumn Fire, Tango, Mustard Pickle, and Chartreuse, dabbing in areas with a tissue whilst it was still wet, to give some white patches. 



For the house blocks I used the addition of Beach Hut for some contrast with the base. I then dry brushed the houses with Snowflake.



I wanted some little mounds of earth for my flowers to grow out of either side of the doors so I used Lin's stencil PS025 with some Grungepaste and once dry, painted the soil with Fresco Chocolate Pudding.



For the windows I used Tim Holtz's Fragments. I had intended to use patterned paper behind them to look like wallpaper but then decided to just paint some cardstock with Mustard Pickle to give the impression of light as you walk past the houses.



As part of my recycling theme, I used the protective corners from a delivery of frames as my rooves. I had some old fashioned wooden pegs from clearing out Mum's house which I thought would be perfect chimneys which I treated in the same way as the houses and then pushed through a hole in the cardboard. But my favourite part was covering the cardboard with hessian to make a thatched roof! As I liked them so much and the houses were quite busy, I left them plain. The other roof had a chimney made from two pieces of dowel, and I covered it with canvas to which I had used my transfer technique to apply Chatsworth paper, and then used Lin's stencil PS005 with Grungepaste mixed with Mustard Pickle.



I used JoFY's stencil PS008 with Grungepaste and Tango and Mustard Pickle and made doors from shrink plastic from Hot Picks HP1509 and HP1601.



I then had some fun decorating the base of the houses with shrink plastic flowers made from ELB 01 ELB 02 and ELB 03.


I had such fun with this relaxing and colourful project, and my love of creating started to come back as I felt myself getting lost in the 'making' for the first time in a while. I didn't really encounter any challenges along the way, apart from a moment of doubt when my husband came into the room and said, 'I thought you were making houses?' ! I hope if you have any wooden stamps left you will consider making something with the blocks, as you can still, of course, use the stamps afterwards - and it means you can use them with the many stamp positioning tools now available, so that's a good excuse!



Blog: Lucy's True Colours

Twitter: CraftyLuce

Monday, 17 June 2019

2019 #9 Arty Wood Blocks: 74 is the eh, Magic Number - with Hot Picks {by Lotte Kristensen}

2019 Topic 9: Arty Wood Blocks


There's something appealing about numbers. I think I could fill a whole wall of collected fonts, sizes and colours. Lotte has created numbers that would work perfectly on my imaginary wall!! ~Leandra.

Hey everyone, Lotte here - blocks don't have to be square, do they??  I do like using odd things as a canvas, whether it's empty food cans or deodorant canisters, and this current topic allowed me to indulge my whimsy and dig out some MDF numbers I've wanted to decorate for a while.  '74' I hear you say; 'what's the deal with that?!'  Well, it *could* be the year Abba won the Eurovision Song Contest..... or how many pennies I found down the back of the sofa..... or the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything (yeah, I know, some people say that's 42... ;)  But anyway, I had great fun playing with the new Hot Picks, which should be available from your usual PaperArtsy stockist


As I was going to use diluted paint washes, I started off by painting my blocks with a couple of coats of white gesso:


Next, I painted on a coat of Slimed Fresco Finish Acrylic Paint and when that was dry, a watered down coat of Venice Blue Fresco Finish Acrylic Paint.



In the picture below, you can see how the block looks when finished with the top coat of blue paint, and how it looks after being sanded down.  Do wear a dust mask when sanding, as neither MDF nor paint dust is good for you!



After sanding all the blocks, I used my fingertips to rub in some watered down French Roast Fresco Finish Acrylic Paint all over, to 'age' the surface:



And then it was finally time to do some stamping! 


On the first block, I  used the time phrase stamp all over in Watering Can Ranger Archival Ink Pad:


Then the tall clock and tiled floor stamp, again in Watering Can.  For the inside bits, I took the stamp off the acrylic block, and used my fingertips to mould it around the curves:


Finally, the rectangular collaged tiles, again in Watering Can:


When everything was thoroughly dry, I dabbed an embossing ink pad around the edges of the blocks, and added some chunky copper embossing powder:


And that's it!  I was actually quite pleased with the end result, for a change - I love the worn look, as if these blocks are really old and tattered.  But the real question is, what will *you* create??



Lotte x

Sunday, 16 June 2019

2019 #9 Arty Wood Blocks: On a Journey with EEA {by Carol Fox}

2019 Topic 9: Arty Wood Blocks

This mobile piece of art combines a gorgeous 'Refreshers' colour palette with some clever painty dyed fibres; transforming basic blocks to truly beautiful ones. Oh, and with wheels! 

Hi everyone, it's Carol Fox with you today, and I'd like to share with you a  house that I have made out of a selection of wooden building blocks.

I put wheels on it to give it a sense of travel, as the stamps I am using by Everything Art are about journey, adventure and exploration.
My house on wheels has my "navigator" on the front, a compass on the back to guide it on its way, a bright flurry of ribbons on the top to flutter in the breeze and a key to wind it up with for when it runs out of Oomph. 

I did have fun making this and I like to think it will cut a rainbow of colours in the sky as it chuggs off on its journey.


I put a slightly larger circle of wood at the back to tip it forward to try and give it the look of rolling along.


I painted all blocks with gesso as my bits of wood were very brightly coloured. I have glued the top bits on but left the wheels loose.



I used the paper my paint came wrapped in and coloured it with with my gelli plate using Fresco paints in shades of Banana, Caribbean Sea, Coral, Cerise and Bubblegum.


  

 


When I stamped my image for the front using the Everything Art stamp set EEA01, I bumped the words by layering them over the image with a darker shade. I also moved the bottom word to the left as the image was slightly too large for my block and I lost some of the word.



I used an image from Everything Art stamp set EEA02 for the back of my block.



I added stamping with an images from  EEA01 using Archival ink to my sides and roof, I then used Carribbean Sea to add blue pops to the whole assemblage. Once this was dry I mixed Fresco Bubble Gum paint with Grunge Paste and applied this through stencils PS034 and PS015.


I added stencilling to my wheels in the same way.


For my tassel I coloured my ribbons to match using the same paints, diluted with water and then mopped up it with the ribbon.




The Paints gave nice muted shades of the painted colours for my tassel.


I stamped the quote from EEA01 onto shrink plastic and used this to make a wire wrapped decoration to add to my tassel.



I used a craft knife to poke a hole in the side to insert the key and stuck on a letter "E" that I found in my stash as I felt the front needed a bit of balance.



To finish I gave it all a bit of a rub with some Treasure Gold and then a quick run around the edges with some Little Black Dress paint.



My favourite part of this is the tassel and wrapped bead. I have made a few of these in recent times to add to the edge of journal pages or to the spine of an altered book as I do like things that make a journal or book chunky. I love to see something poking out the edge of a journal, it just makes me want to pick it up and look at it.


I hope you enjoyed my post.

Carol xx

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A View from PaperArtsy HQ

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Even though we've been blogging for quite some time only just figured out the followers button, so please follow us to hear about all that is new in the land of PaperArtsy. We'd love to share our ideas with you! Leandra

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A View from PaperArtsy HQ